Shamanism: Are miracles of healing true or false?

South Moluccan Shaman exorcising evil spirits occupying children, Buru. 1920.

Shamans gain knowledge and the power to heal by entering into the spiritual world or dimension. Most shamans have dreams or visions that tell them certain things. The shaman may have or acquire many spirit guides in the spirit world, who often guide and direct the shaman in his/her travels. These spirit guides are always present within the shaman though others only encounter them when the shaman is in a trance. The spirit guide energizes the shaman, enabling him/her to enter the spiritual dimension. The shaman heals within the spiritual dimension by returning ‘lost’ parts of the human soul from wherever they have gone. The shaman also cleanses excess negative energies which confuse or pollute the soul. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shamanism[8]

Such practices of healing seem very strange to we who favor medical intervention in the form of hospitals, drugs and surgeries, but many swear by the power of the spirit.  The danger is to foolishly ignore medicine in favor of faith. I read one account of a fundamental Christian group, led by their pastor, whose little girl got a tumor.  They chose to pray rather than go to the doctor.  Ultimately, social services forced the family to take the child to a physician.  Unfortunately, the child died. What was most sad is that this particular form of cancerous tumor could have been successfully treated had it been diagnosed in its early days.  The family lost not only their little girl, but also their faith.

Miracles of healing do occur though.  Next week, I am going to post a blog about a current-day Brazilian healer.

Buy my books!

Unexpected Journey (www.roguephoenixpress.com): historical coming of age novel about a shaman, a rich girl and a street girl who end up in colonial Philadelphia.

Kindle edition: $5.99

FREE: Misty, the London Pony,  is based on a true story. An illustrated children’s story is available as a free PDF download.

 

  

Champion, the Dream Horse, about Mara Sue, who lives in Kentucky, is poor, but determined to own the horse of her dreams.

Kindle edition: $2.99  

Emily’s Shadow (www.bloodmoonpublishing.com): supernatural fantasy set in Cornwall, where Merlin made magic.

  Kindle edition:   $4.79

 

Arabian Appaloosa Horses

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:RabicanoArab.jpg

This Arabian horse is a chestnut with a blaze.  He reminds me of my AraAppaloosa, Rocket, who was also a chestnut with a white blaze on his nose. Rocket was 75 percent Arab and 25 percent Appy.  He was full of high spirits, but very gentle and intelligent.

AraAppaloosas are known to be marvelous endurance horses. 

Although I never took the Rock on an endurance ride, he eventually became an endurance horse for the boy who bought him after my divorce.  It was very painful letting him go. I’d raised him since he was a yearling and trained him myself. I considered giving him away, but decided whoever got him needed to pay in order to cherish him.  The boy had a thousand dollars in cash, down to crumpled one dollar bills he must have faithfully saved.  I was happy for Rocket because he went to live on a farm with many other horses.

Buy my books!

FREE: Misty, the London Pony,  is based on a true story. An illustrated children’s story is available as a free PDF download.

 

  

Champion, the Dream Horse, about Mara Sue, who lives in Kentucky, is poor, but determined to own the horse of her dreams.

Kindle edition: $2.99  

Emily’s Shadow (www.bloodmoonpublishing.com): supernatural fantasy set in Cornwall, where Merlin made magic.

  Kindle edition:   $4.79

  

Unexpected Journey (www.roguephoenixpress.com): historical coming of age novel about a shaman, a rich girl and a street girl who end up in colonial Philadelphia.

Kindle edition: $5.99

A Bay Mare

 

Baby Doll was a wonderful horse who belonged to my neighbor, a dairy farmer’s daughter. She graciously let me bring Baby up to my place to keep company with Sugar, a paint mare I’d bought.  Sugar was desperately lonely.  Horses, like people, need others of their own kind.  Baby and Sugar became the very best of friends.

And Baby Doll became an amazing friend to me.  She took me on many a gallop through corn-fields. We raced with deer.  We swam in a lake. She was beautiful, and feisty too.

If you’d like to read a poem about her, go to my website and scroll down: A Bay Mare

Buy my books!

FREE: Misty, the London Pony,  is based on a true story. An illustrated children’s story is available as a free PDF download.

 

  

Champion, the Dream Horse, about Mara Sue, who lives in Kentucky, is poor, but determined to own the horse of her dreams.

Kindle edition: $2.99  

Emily’s Shadow (www.bloodmoonpublishing.com): supernatural fantasy set in Cornwall, where Merlin made magic.

  Kindle edition:   $4.79

  

Unexpected Journey (www.roguephoenixpress.com): historical coming of age novel about a shaman, a rich girl and a street girl who end up in colonial Philadelphia.

Kindle edition: $5.99

Horses, Big and Small

http://flickr.com/photos/18087788@N00/95322238  

When I was a girl, I yearned for horses, big or small, bay or chestnut, dapple gray or pink. Eventually I owned three, Baby Doll, Sugar, and Rocket. I’ll post more about them later.

 

Buy my books!

FREE: Misty, the London Pony,  is based on a true story. An illustrated children’s story is available as a free PDF download.

 

  

Champion, the Dream Horse, about Mara Sue, who lives in Kentucky, is poor, but determined to own the horse of her dreams.

Kindle edition: $2.99  

Emily’s Shadow (www.bloodmoonpublishing.com): supernatural fantasy set in Cornwall, where Merlin made magic.

  Kindle edition:   $4.79

  

Unexpected Journey (www.roguephoenixpress.com): historical coming of age novel about a shaman, a rich girl and a street girl who end up in colonial Philadelphia.

Kindle edition: $5.99

Should you quit your day job?

1184. That’s what I got as a royalty, and actually, I didn’t get it, because the amount has to be over twenty five dollars before the publisher issues a check. Yes, that’s right. I got $11.84 in royalties. So, should I have quit my day job? Not for the fame and the money. Not if I needed an income to pay for the kid’s shoes.

Over twenty years ago, I quit my job to become a writer. I wanted an authentic new way of life. People told me not to do it. My husband was pissed I gave up a $40,000/year job which back then was quite a lot of income. We later divorced–not entirely the outcome of my deciding to be a writer which was a symptom of wanting a more vital life.

Has becoming a writer been more meaningful than being a chemist, the job I chucked?

I have had a lot of freedom. I have never missed mixing chemicals. I got specialized training in ministry and spirituality which fascinate me, subjects I never would have had the energy or time to study before. I have never starved, but had I needed to provide for children, my choices would have been more difficult and different.

The plusses outweigh the negatives, but my income has been seriously low for a long time and I’ve had to live off the guy who is my second husband. I hate being dependent, but luckily my guy is also a writer, so he understands. He also worked as a professor, a job he enjoyed, which paid our bills.

I do not regret having left a job I never felt much passion for, and I have learned so much on this writer-journey. I have learned the first flow of writing is a wonderful high, but doesn’t last. Kindof like that guy or gal who is so perfect. You must have him or her. But then…

Creative moments need to be honed, shaped, and rewritten with an analytical view not contingent on being in love. That first flush of words is so marvelous, but upon a deeper look, those words are in need of serious deepening. You gotta hang out with the other, get to know him or her, give selflessly to him or her, forget about yourself, learn new things, be open to fresh possibilities.

An editor/publisher suggested to me long ago I ought to take a class in how to write. I was not deeply offended, but I didn’t get it. I thought I could write. Sure, I had down grammar and sentence structure, which aspiring writers had better understand, but I hadn’t yet opened a creative artery. It took me years to develop the skills necessary to write creatively. It’s true of relationships and of writing–if it’s to be worthwhile, don’t give up, work on it…

Hopefully, in the twenty years or so I’ve been struggling to write meaningful prose, I have become a fairly decent writer.

You decide.

Buy my books!

Emily’s Shadow: www.bloodmoonpublishing.com

Kindle edition: http://www.amazon.com/Emilys-Shadow-ebook/dp/B004PYD8NS/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1314193199&sr=1-1   $4.79

Unexpected Journey: www.roguephoenixpress.com

Kindle edition: http://www.amazon.com/Unexpected-Journey-ebook/dp/B005I585ZE/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1314034213&sr=1-1  $5.99

Champion, the Dream Horse (kindle edition): http://www.amazon.com/Champion-The-Dream-Horse-ebook/dp/B004XD18LU/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1314193429&sr=1-1   $2.99

The Wishing Tradition

At one time there was a chapel opposite St. Michael’s Mount in Cornwall built for pilgrims on their way to to the Mount. I don’t think it exists any more. Old-time pilgrimages ended in the mid-sixteenth century, but here is an image of another St. Catherine’s Chapel in Dorset (about 400 miles north).  This chapel has an interesting tradition of wishing associated with it:

“This involves using the niches (one for the knee and two for the hands) in the east jamb of the south doorway to ‘post’ prayers to the saint asking for her help.

The chapel is frequently visited by women searching for a husband, St Catherine being the patron saint of spinsters. A traditional prayer used here by these women says:

A husband, St Catherine,
A handsome one, St Catherine,
A rich one, St Catherine,
A nice one, St Catherine,
And soon, St Catherine.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Catherine%27s_Chapel,_Abbotsbury

Buy Emily’s Shadow, a fantasy novel set in Tintagel, Cornwall. by Christina St. Clair at www.christinastclair.com

Lenni Lenape Shaman

Lenape Lenape performing traditional dance, dressed as the Mesingoholikan, an incarnation of the spirit who negotiated between people and the spirits of animals they killed, c. 1900.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenni_Lenape

In Unexpected Journey, (historical fiction novel–500 pages) Gishuk, who is hoping to become a Lenni Lenape shaman, leads his people in a ritual during the Gamwing, an annual ceremony of thanksgiving.  The people dance wildly within their Bighouse to try to ward off a storm they think has been sent by Nenabush the Great Spirit to avenge the death of wolves.

Read an excerpt

Buy Unexpected Journey available as an ebook: HTML, PDF, and Mobipocket (compatible with Amazon Kindle). 

Also available as a POD book (500 pages).

Author Interview with Melissa Cabrera

Emily’s Shadow is now available as a POD book.

So far, the book has got good reviews.

I was interviewed by Melissa Cabrera who hosts a funky/interesting website: http://www.werevampsromance.org/

Interview:

Melissa: Can you tell us a little about yourself?

Christina: First, I want to thank you, Melissa, for your passion and energy for books. I love your website. Your review of Emily’s Shadow is a big help and encouragement to me.

About me: I was born and raised in London, England. After I quit school, I worked in a job I hated, doing animal research. I rescued three of the mice, quit the job, and set off to France where I met an American GI, fell in love and moved to the U.S.

Melissa: Do you recall how your interest in writing originated?

Christina: My father passed away suddenly, and I had to go to England for his funeral. I’d been feeling as if my life lacked meaning, and heard Joseph Campbell say follow your bliss. What was mine, I wondered? I didn’t know. But here I was in England, and to entertain my little nephews, I began telling them stories, and decided I’d try my hand at becoming a writer.

Read Complete Interview at http://www.werevampsromance.org/apps/blog/entries/search?query=Emily%27s+Shadow

e-book version: www.bloodmoonpublishing.com

Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/Emilys-Shadow-ebook/dp/B004PYD8NS/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1312932932&sr=1-1

POD: www.lulu.com

 

 

Marazion

Marazion is another beautiful place in Cornwall, opposite St Michael’s Mount.

Its strange name has one odd explanation. Supposedly it commemorates Jewish traders whe came to hold fairs, and to purchase tin. Marazion is supposed to mean Bitter Zion to help the Jewish traders remember the Sweet Zion–the Jerusalem-they’d left behind. (The Spiritual Traveler. Mahway, New Jersey: Hidden Spring. 2000. p. 207).

There is disagreement about the name’s origin: John Maidment http://blogjam.name/?p=1171 says “Marazion [ˌmærəˈzaɪən] is a market town at the eastern end of Mount’s Bay and its name has caused an awful lot of confusion and has even led some poor souls to hypothesise that the ancient Cornish were a lost tribe of Israel!
There is no confusion about the first element maraz, which derives from the Cornish marghas meaning “market”. There are a few other names containing this element, including the wonderful Marazanvose [ˌmarəzənˈvəʊz] (“the market by the wall”) between Truro and Perranporth.”

Buy Emily’s Shadow, a fantasy novel set in Tintagel, Cornwall. by Christina St. Clair at www.christinastclair.com

Prefer Paper? Purchase POD of Emily’s Shadow

Review by Melissa Cabrera of http://www.werevampsromance.org/

What a great YA read this was. This book is such a page turner. The characters were well developed and the world in which they were placed was so well described and full of historic details. The pace and storyline were very enjoyable. This suspensful, World War II, is a recommended read for any reader (male or female) from YA+.

 What are print on demand (POD) books:

Print on demand (POD), sometimes called, in error, publish on demand, is a printing technology and business process in which new copies of a book (or other document) are not printed until an order has been received. “Print on Demand” developed only after digital printing began,[1] because it was not economical to print single copies using traditional printing technology such as letterpress and offset printing.

Many traditional small presses have replaced their traditional printing equipment with POD equipment or contract their printing out to POD service providers. Many academic publishers, including university presses, use POD services to maintain a large backlist; some even use POD for all of their publications.[2] Larger publishers may use POD in special circumstances, such as reprinting older titles that had been out of print or for performing test marketing.[3]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Print_on_Demand

Emily’s Shadow has been released by the publisher, www.bloodmoonpublishing.com, as a POD book available from:

http://www.lulu.com/product/paperback/emily%e2%80%99s-shadow/16513812?productTrackingContext=search_results/search_shelf/center/2

It is also available as an e-book from several retail outlets, including www.bloodmoonpublishing.com and www.amazon.com kindle store